Tag Archives: Iran

A SXSW panel on UGC and censorship, via twitter


We couldn’t make it to SXSW in Texas because we’re stuck in rainy old Blighty but when  we heard about a panel debate called The User Generated Revolution, Social Media Overcoming Censorship we followed the tweets compulsively. And we thought we should make it easy for you to do the same. Below are some hand-picked reactions from Josh Halliday of The Guardian, Joanna Geary of the Times, Jonathan Cohen, founder of Support Local Grow Together in Austin and panellist Sanam Dolatshahi.

Lots of comments of the importance of verifying the accuracy of UGC news

So it seems that

Those priorities winning support
http://twitter.com/#!/JRCohen/status/46956290173440000

But it’s not all that easy…

Especially given that

And important because

And finally, a perhaps unexpected insight that…

Here’s the background:

The panel featured 4 BBC journos, Abi Sawyer from BBC World Service Future Media, Julian Siddle, creator of the tech programme Digital Lifestyles, Raymond Li, head of BBC Chinese and Sanam Dolatshahi, presenter and producer on BBC Persia’s Interactive program Nowbat-e Shoma (Your Turn). Here’s the blurb for the event:

Social media is becoming an essential tool for activists in repressive societies. In 2009 the Iranian government expelled foreign media and jammed international broadcasts. For the BBC’s Persian TV emails, video, Twitter and Facebook postings from Iran became the main source of news. Groundbreaking stories were complied using material from viewers and listeners – often sent in with great personal risk to themselves. In the Xingjian province of China government censors were defeated by a tweet – news of a popular uprising amongst the regions Uighurs in this remote province leaked out to the world’s media. A military clampdown ensued, but not before foreign media got to the region and heard the Uighurs grievances. Conversely the oppressors use the same social media tools, partly to spread disinformation about their activities, but also in the cases of groups such as the Taliban, to push their beliefs. The panel will discuss how censorship and suppression is made more and more difficult to hide by the social media revolution, and the impact of this for traditional media organisations.

HARRIET BIRD

Interview with Matthew Eltringham – UGC at the BBC


Your2pence speaks to Matthew Eltringham, founding editor of the BBC UGC Hub. He discusses UGC’s defining moments at the BBC and his theory that the future of UGC is increasingly in the power of ‘sharing’…

What news story has UGC had the biggest impact on?

What stories work best for UGC?

Does UGC risk softening news?

Has it helped re-engage your audience?

What more will the BBC UGC Hub be doing to connect with social media platforms?

What is the future of UGC?

What are the limits of citizen journalist\’s participation?

EMILY ARCHER

Can UGC topple the regime?


For almost a week now the Egyptian protests have  dominated the news agenda.

Non stop rolling images of burning trucks, marches and adrenaline fuelled Egyptians (while the army and police look on) have taken centre stage as  tens of thousands take to the streets to protest against Hosni Mubarak’s thirty year presidency.

Courtesy of Egyptian citizen and friend Islam Harouf

Old protest v New protest

Social protest in Egypt and the wider Middle East is nothing new, but this time the internet and UGC has played a vital part in organising protestors and relaying real time images to the world’s media.

In Iran in 1979 for example the proliferation of tapes of Khoemini preaching did much to whip the Iranians into a frenzy. In 1990, the Gulf War was the first time satellites were used to produce real time images of fighting and conflict. In 2011, social networking sites, particularly twitter, facebook and youtube as well as camera and video phones have been instrumental in keeping us up-to-date as well as organising protesters.

Courtesy of Egyptian citizen and friend Islam Harouf

The April 6th movement for example, by far the most active and well known of all the protest movements has used blogs, facebook and twitter for years to spread the news of the protests and mobilize people.

And Sherine Barakat, interviewed on BBC news said of Egypt, “Today every person is a journalist.” It is no secret that Egyptians love the internet and that postings of film, images and twitter made by ordinary Egyptians armed with camera phones has appeared on the pages of the BBC, al-jazeera and other news agencies and channels across the world as well as keeping friends, family and other loved ones in the loop.

Courtesy of Egyptian citizen and friend Islam Harouf

In fact the internet has proved to be so dangerous that the government disconnected it on Thursday evening. Thats 80 million people offline. All April6th correspondence ends then.

What does this mean? Several things. The Government is scared.  Mubarak has realised that pictures are powerful.Violence could erupt – after all who is left monitoring unfolding events.

Or it could be the final nail in Mubarak’s coffin. The Egyptian people don’t look like they are backing down, but so far neither does he.

masr inshallah kulu qweies (Egypt, god willing all will be good)